New Look

New York & Company 7th Avenue Suit Collection (similar here & here)  Diamond Earrings  (similar here)  Vintage Velvet Party Hat (similar here) Vintage Suede Handbag – J. Colleen Boutique Carrano Jeweled Pumps (sold at Piperlime)

With December upon us, it seems to be a bit of a misnomer to conceal ourselves with the hue known as winter white. Quite the contrary, fashionably speaking, as within the history of fashion there has been only two primary colors used frequently being Black & White. Worn separately or merged seamlessly together, this combination is often referred to as a classic. I’ve discovered over the years from merchandising a variety of techniques to convert such a profound ensemble of purity and timidities.  The antiquated guideline of wearing this classic combination as one is blending its elegance in a timeless-chic sense of balance.

As mentioned in previously written articles of mine, in particular, Christian Dior’s “New Look”, an image that took a vivid shift during the post-war fashion from the late 1940s. Gathering the same fundamentals that Dior displayed in 1947 as Carmel Snow, Editor-in-Chief of Harper Bazaar was quoted stating, “It’s such a new look!” after her initial viewing of Dior’s spring/summer collection. I’ve discovered that a woman’s silhouette is her story, strength, beauty, presenting such a feminine quality. With a claim of a wishful desire to bring back beauty through the usage of utilizing feminine clothing with soft rounded shapes which embrace the woman’s physique.Dior, along with myself, share the vision of bringing back a sense of timeless grace, inherited through the fabrics, textures, and accessories that I garnish creating a practical yet wearable ensemble.

Troves of Russia

Cape Sheath Dress – New York & Company (similar here)  Fur Hat – Topshop  Earrings & Brooch – Vintage (similar here) Gloves – Vintage  Heels – Corso Como

A Cape extends the classic silhouette of a structured sheath dress exerting such mystery. Over the years fashion in combination with costume history made use of capes and mantles of all sorts, having played a role during the Victorian age. From 1910, capes were defined by Paul Poiret as he transformed the origin of its shape becoming the first ethnic-inspired design which was entitled a Tanger.

During the height of the roaring twenties, well-renowned actresses were portrayed displaying elegant chiffon gowns accompanied by coordinating capes. While an array of designers experimented with fabrics that consisted of wool, figured cloth, wool Melton, satin, silk, pleated chiffon, velvet, velveteen, bourdon lace, lace, moiré, taffeta and mourning crepe. All of which being trimmed to perfection, a grand number were seen as avant-garde becoming iconic in the history of fashion. In later years, the cape was replaced by the fur stole only to return sporadically in a selected array of designer collections.  Adorned capes today can be alluring, leaving the body form to move generously with its feminine undertone.Portraying an alternative to the traditional dress coat or trench, the cape provides an undeniable sense of glam that manifests details and tailoring. Combing a striking happy medium between a structured sheath dress along with an equally length cape, an evening of striking drama awaits.

A Story through Illustration with The Daily Fashion Project

For more than a decade the expression “A picture is worth a thousand words” refers to the notion that a complex idea can be conveyed with just a single image.  In years past a similar phrase, “One look is worth a thousand words”, appeared in the 1913 newspaper advertisement for the Piqua Auto Supply House of Piqua, Ohio.

For others like Matthew Miller, an illustrator from the Savannah College of Art and Design in Atlanta entwined his appreciation for men’s fashion within a blog format entitled, The Daily Fashion Project.  Inspired by the mixture of art and Menswear, Miller or better known as ‘Sunflowerman’ finds fashion as a way humans interact with the world and stories they share.  With the misplacement of society an individual can become lost in the shuffle of brand names, social media and life itself. Miller urges others to ask the question of whom these individuals are, what struggles and triumphs they have overcome or achieved along with their reasoning for what they wear.  With The Daily Fashion Project Miller gathers these enriched stories distributing them through a new perspective, with an illustration.

View my story through illustration here.