Troves of Russia

Cape Sheath Dress – New York & Company (similar here)  Fur Hat – Topshop  Earrings & Brooch – Vintage (similar here) Gloves – Vintage  Heels – Corso Como

A Cape extends the classic silhouette of a structured sheath dress exerting such mystery. Over the years fashion in combination with costume history made use of capes and mantles of all sorts, having played a role during the Victorian age. From 1910, capes were defined by Paul Poiret as he transformed the origin of its shape becoming the first ethnic-inspired design which was entitled a Tanger.

During the height of the roaring twenties, well-renowned actresses were portrayed displaying elegant chiffon gowns accompanied by coordinating capes. While an array of designers experimented with fabrics that consisted of wool, figured cloth, wool Melton, satin, silk, pleated chiffon, velvet, velveteen, bourdon lace, lace, moiré, taffeta and mourning crepe. All of which being trimmed to perfection, a grand number were seen as avant-garde becoming iconic in the history of fashion. In later years, the cape was replaced by the fur stole only to return sporadically in a selected array of designer collections.  Adorned capes today can be alluring, leaving the body form to move generously with its feminine undertone.Portraying an alternative to the traditional dress coat or trench, the cape provides an undeniable sense of glam that manifests details and tailoring. Combing a striking happy medium between a structured sheath dress along with an equally length cape, an evening of striking drama awaits.

A Story through Illustration with The Daily Fashion Project

For more than a decade the expression “A picture is worth a thousand words” refers to the notion that a complex idea can be conveyed with just a single image.  In years past a similar phrase, “One look is worth a thousand words”, appeared in the 1913 newspaper advertisement for the Piqua Auto Supply House of Piqua, Ohio.

For others like Matthew Miller, an illustrator from the Savannah College of Art and Design in Atlanta entwined his appreciation for men’s fashion within a blog format entitled, The Daily Fashion Project.  Inspired by the mixture of art and Menswear, Miller or better known as ‘Sunflowerman’ finds fashion as a way humans interact with the world and stories they share.  With the misplacement of society an individual can become lost in the shuffle of brand names, social media and life itself. Miller urges others to ask the question of whom these individuals are, what struggles and triumphs they have overcome or achieved along with their reasoning for what they wear.  With The Daily Fashion Project Miller gathers these enriched stories distributing them through a new perspective, with an illustration.

View my story through illustration here.

An Era Gone By | San Francisco, August 1950

Gabardine Wool  ‘Lady Scott’ Suit – Vintage Heirloom (Doris Alexander) Earrings – Vintage (similar here) Vintage Feather Brim Hat – Christine Original (similar here) Heels – Dolce Vita

While the women of the 1940’s to 1950’s were deprived of the latest fashion garments due to wartime regulation, which limited the amount of fabric that could be manufactured. A practical template consisting of emblematic wide-shoulders, a slim-waist and narrow-hips, a silhouette of the 1940’s had been established.

When asked of a specific year of an era gone by that enriched my personal style aesthetic I effortlessly state, “February 1947, with Christian Dior’s first collection entitled, New Look.”  As an adolescence, my memories of afternoons staring at a collection of silver plated frames that all possess memories of a past era of elegances and grace. A worn photograph taken in August of 1950 displays a moment in time which strides to resign as an enriched remembrance, Taylor Street. A street in San Francisco that my grandparent’s strolled in such happiness after they exchanged vows gives the traditional wedding attire a variation.  A tailored wool gabardine suit accented with cloth buttons, takes advantage of a current color of the era. In much respect of the era, to behold a garment enriched in such a matter is relatively a gift.Perhaps the most foreseen question lies with my grandmother’s choice to choose blue rather than the traditional color palette of white. Conversing with my mother over a cup of tea, I discovered my grandmother desired to wear the same color which my grandfather had chosen. She also explained due to financial difficulties, neither one could afford to purchase an elaborate dress for such an occasion. My grandmother was known as a simple woman who provided for those who were in need, giving rather than receiving. She solely distilled such an era of grace and humbleness to my life from her physical affection, to her bestowed collection of costume jewelry.

In loving memory of Robert & Doris Alexander